Blue Flax

486 in stock

    • 45 $
Quantity

$3.75

Quick Overview

Blue Flax

To grow from seed, it is best to sow the seed in the late fall or the early spring. Cover with ¼ inch of soil and pat the soil down. In the fall, leave the seed to germinate in the spring. If seeding in the spring, moisten the soil and keep it slightly moist until germination. The plants require full sun, but they are drought resistant. Mature plants can obtain a height of 30 inches. The plants DO NOT transplant well. Individual flowers rarely last more than a day, but the plant is constantly producing new buds. Usually plants started from seed in the spring will not bloom until the following year, but plants started in the fall usually bloom the following summer. The striking blue color of the individual flowers is unforgettable.

Type Spacing Planting Depth Days to Germination Blossoms
Annual 8 in. 1/2 in. 14-21 60-90

Blue Flax

Blue Flax is an herbaceous perennial that is native to western North America and the Great Plains from Alaska to California and parts of Mexico. The plant is also native to other parts of the world including Northern Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia. The plant was known and used by the early Mesopotamians, Egyptians and Greeks. Native Americans used the plant for cordage, string, mats, snowshoes, fishing nets and baskets. Medicinally, they would create poultices for swelling, eye problems and gastrointestinal distress from various parts of the plant. The seed was consumed for its nutritional benefits. On July 9, 1806, on their return journey, Lewis and Clark collected seed from Blue Flax plants they found in Montana. Members of the entire expedition had been intrigued with the beauty of the plant as they made their way west and many of them commented about the Blue Flax in their respective diaries. Some of the plants collected on the expedition have been preserved and are part of a permanent exhibition at The Lewis and Clark Herbarium in The Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia.

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